WildCRU / Living with Tigers Project

WildCRU / Living with Tigers Project

ALL ABOUT TIGERS

 

This month is all about tigers and we have donated to Oxford University's WildCRU to support the 'Living with Tigers project'. Here's more about their work and conservation research ........

 

Tiger populations in Nepal have increased by 63% since 2008 as a result of successful efforts to control illegal poaching. While it’s amazing news, it’s led to a new conservation challenge – protecting the tiger population and local communities from human-tiger conflict.

In the Terai lowlands of Nepal, a major initiative by the Nepal Government and conservation NGOs to enforce zero poaching of tigers has resulted in a recovery of tiger populations in Chitwan and Bardia National Parks.

However, the regions surrounding these parks also have some of Nepal’s most dense rural human population, composed mainly of very poor communities that rely heavily on forest resources. As a result, there has been an increase in human-tiger conflict, with people and livestock being attacked by tigers.

To help prevent Nepal’s success in tiger conservation being undermined by this conflict, WildCRU has teamed up with the Nepalese organisation 'Green Governance Nepal' to engage the communities around Chitwan and Bardia in devising participatory approaches to ensure their safety, improve their livelihoods, and prevent retaliatory killing of tigers.

To this end, WildCRU are working with around 1200 households across eight communities around these parks. Their work involves implementing practical measures to improve the safety of people and livestock; developing supplementary livelihood opportunities to reduce dependence on the forested areas where tigers live, and addressing behaviours which put both people and tigers at great risk.

If you are thinking how can I help 'save the tiger' and want to know more about WildCRU's work then read/donate to WildCRU HERE 

Critically Endangered Painted Dog Conservation

Critically Endangered Painted Dog Conservation

Heres why we have decided to support The Painted Dogs Conservation The African Wild Dog (otherwise known as the Painted Dog) unfortunately don't get as much publicity as their other four-legged wild neighbours in Africa. People rarely hear about these unique and loyal beings that are extremely endangered and near enough extinct with only 1% remain in the wild. Thats why we at BornWild had to step in and spread the word as well as support them as much as we can. Enjoy reading more.......

The Painted Dog Conservation's mission is to protect and increase the range and numbers of Painted Dogs in Zimbabwe and they do an amazing job. However, they need all the help they can get since the African Wild Dog is hugely endangered. Their main extinction threats are: in Poaching/Road kills and Diseases

PDC have got these areas covered and working around the clock employing local people to help carry out their programmes. Not only creating an environment where the dogs can survive but also working with the communities, creating the environment for the dogs to thrive.

Programmes include Anti-poaching Units, Rehabilitation Centre, Re-introduction Programme and an Education centre for young children to learn about the conservation of the Painted Dogs.

Every year a thousand children visit visit the Bush Camp - for less than $15 a day. They stay a week - and for the first time in their lives, they see the dogs and wildlife that live just miles from their villages.

The Rehabilitation Center in Zimbabwe, takes care of sick, injured and orphaned painted dogs. When the Animals are recovered, they are released back into the wild. 

They also have a brilliant research unit. By putting as many collars with transmitters as possible on the painted dogs, researchers of the project can collect data on the whereabouts of the dogs. In this way the animals can be located faster if they get into trouble. The collar also protects the dogs against snares. 

3000 snares get found and collected by the Anti-Poaching Unit each year. The snares are then taken to the Art Centre to create crafts. 20-30 local people at the art centre  gain employment from that. Here is some examples of what they make..

If you like what youve read and want to visit, be part or donate to the worthy Painted Dog visit Bush Camp then please follow the word here Painted Dogs

WildCRU / Wildlife Conservation Research Unit  'LION GUARDIAN' Programme

WildCRU / Wildlife Conservation Research Unit 'LION GUARDIAN' Programme

Improving the lives of Wild Animals and Human conflict in Africa. WildCRU set their sights on improving this conflict so that wild animals have a better chance of survival, being able to increase their numbers and living a more peaceful life alongside humans. We at BornWild think that this programme is not only innovative but essential in ensuring less human/carnivore conflict in the future years.

Here is a little more info about the 'Lion Guardian' programme: 

Conflict between carnivores and human communities poses a serious threat to the persistence of carnivores in the wild, as well as impacting the lives and livelihoods of impoverished people living in the vicinity of protected areas. WildCRU's project has gained a solid understanding of the magnitude and importance of conflict. Their approach is to work with the community to try to limit conflict incidents.

'LION GUARDIANS'

The programme uses locally employed villagers, known locally as ‘Long Shields’ to assist the community with livestock protection and to provide a liaison with wildlife management and conservation bodies. During the course of their day, the Long shields are on the ground amongst their people and actively patrolling their ‘territories’. They monitor animal movements (both domestic and wild) using regularly walked survey routes looking for tracks. They monitor and consult on the strength and maintenance of people’s bomas (livestock enclosures) and in many cases help repair or rebuild them.

EARLY WARNING SYSTEM - LION WATCH

WildCRU closely monitors lion prides, with GPS satellite collars, situated on the park boundary that they know from experience are likely to come into conflict with people and provide an early warning system to local people through their ‘lion guardian’ programme. Because of the improved communication now due to the issuing of 3G capable phones and through an app called “Whatsapp” the guardians are part of a live feed of information and react very quickly to potential problems. When a lion moves out of the protected area in to community lands the local Lion Shield is alerted and they in turn inform their community and the livestock are moved elsewhere. In some cases the Lion Shield physically chases the lion back into the protected area. Our lion watch early warning system has issued almost 200 warnings and averted livestock raiding directly on 35 occasions.

COMMUNITY FENCING

One important area that can be improved to mitigate losses of livestock to wild predators is husbandry of livestock. WILDCRU'S findings suggest that a common factor in many conflict incidents is that animals are left out of protective bomas (corrals) at night, or are poorly protected during the day. A potential solution that we are pioneering is to encourage villagers to communally and collaboratively herd cattle in the day and to keep them protected in a well-constructed communal boma during the night. WildCRU's ‘mobile bomas’ are constructed of portable materials (cable and PVC canvas sheets) rather than the traditional logs and brushwood.  The opaque nature of the boma material, compared to high visibility of traditional bomas, means that predators are unable to see into the enclosure and are unwilling to risk jumping the walls. This method of herding may also be beneficial for crop production; the cattle urinate and dung and break up the soil cap, fertilising the land needs for up to three years. The first communal boma was introduced in May 2013 and the use and benefits of the programme are being monitored by the project.

ANTI-POACHING ASSISTANCE

Since 2008, Hwange Lion Researchers have been involved in supporting and/or managing an anti-poaching unit (APU). The anti-poaching project aims to provide the man-power, logistical support and resources to assist Parks and Wildlife Management Authority Zimbabwe, to reduce levels of bushmeat and other poaching, in the boundary areas of Hwange National Park. The APU unit consists of fully equipped, professionally trained and uniformed anti-poaching scouts. They are paid, fed, equipped and housed by the project. WildCRU also provide transport for patrol deployments and transport of arrested poachers to police custody.

SCHOOL OUTREACH

It is crucially important to engage the local community on important issues surrounding the problems of lion depredation on livestock. With this is mind WildCRU have written and produced a comic book that introduces important aspects of the project. The comic was distributed free of charge to schoolchildren in the area. They also visit local schools and spoke about lions and the work we do, including the history and importance of lions to our economy, our ecosystem and our cultures.

If you would like to read more or donate to WildCRU's amazing conservation unit then please head over to their website www.wildcru.org and Wildlife Conservation Research Unit www.ox.ac.uk (WildCRU) is the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford. 


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